From the Field - Winter 2014

Continuum,
Volume 28,
Issue 1,
Winter 2014

Athique critiques overarching theories of global media flows and markets that continue to rely on theoretical understandings of media reception largely derived from an era before media mobility and intercultural communication were the focus. As a result, Athique rearticulates the theoretical work on transnationalism through a technologically and politically updated configuration that acknowledges 21st century reception practices. Athique provides some conceptual terrain in an effort to prompt other scholars to continue work focused on transnational audiences and media flow.

Continuum,
Volume 28,
Issue 1,
Winter 2014

Acknowledging the commercial significance of formats in the global TV industry, Moran and Aveyard argue that TV formats nonetheless represent a paradox. While highly mobile, transformable and transferable between cultures and nations, formats can also take on and embed themselves within local social and cultural aspects. Thus, Moran and Aveyard explore the qualities of these multi-layered geographic interrelationships, and interrogate the values and language by which we have understood formats until now.

Continuum,
Volume 28,
Issue 1,
Winter 2014

May and Ma analyze Hong Kong as a film production hub between Beijing and Hollywood. Examining the impact of the Closer Economic Partnership Agreement (CEPA) on Hong Kong production, the authors suggest that while the last decade of film production has been beneficial to the local Hong Kong industry, it does not alleviate the uncertain role Hong Kong will play in the future of Chinese cinema.

Continuum,
Volume 28,
Issue 1,
Winter 2014

Nakajima investigates how audiences find and view unsanctioned Chinese independent films in Beijing. Focusing on locations and formats, Nakajima argues that audiences enable the production of Chinese independent films by providing resources for the production, distribution, and exhibition of independent films. These resources are otherwise not available since these films are not authorized by the State. In addition to furthering research into the under-explored facets of the Chinese film industry, Nakajima’s study contributes to work on co-creativity, fan-production, and prosumer discourses.

Continuum,
Volume 28,
Issue 2,
Winter 2014

French suggests that despite women being under-represented in the Australian media industries, these industries are doing little to improve the situation. As a result, this essay emphasizes the need to reconsider the way scholars think about the contribution and innovation of women in media production. French explores barriers to progression, representation across job positions, and considers a few select success stories. Ultimately, French argues that gender equity benefits media production culturally, creatively, and economically, and media industries need to recognize the multi-faceted ways women contribute to their success, and start making efforts to better represent females among their creative leaders and workforces.

Convergence,
January 2014

Brown reviews conventional approaches to studying online media piracy, arguing that most of these are limited to the economic issues raised by piracy, such as negative impact on sales for the media industries. Brown critiques the unreliable data these approaches adopt and suggests scholars need to think in terms of multiple piracies, not a monolithic piracy. Brown calls for alternative, qualitative forms of studying piracy, like interviews or focus groups, in order to get at the complex social forms that constitute and drive the online, unauthorized exchange of media. 

Historical Journal of Film Radio and Television,
Volume 34,
Issue 1,
Winter 2014

James Chapman and Charles Drazin collect a number of essays derived from research at the archive of Film Finances Ltd., a completion guarantee company established in London in 1950, and now operating globally with a headquarters in LA. Charles Drazin revisits the formative years of Film Finance, while Sarah Street examines the impact of the company on British new wave films during a period of transformation for the British film industry. James Chapman charts the production history of producer Harry Saltzman, shedding light on the political economy of British film production in the 1950s and 60s. Finally, Sue Harper conducts a case study of the film Tom Jones (1963) to characterize some missteps of Film Finance, and Justin Smith interrogates the value the Film Finance Archive can bring to detailed production histories and our historical understanding of the relations between capital and creativity in the UK.

The Information Society,
Volume 30,
Issue 1,
Winter 2014

Bauer and Obar identify significant political and economic goals that drive the net neutrality debate and analyze the proposed solutions that would help reconcile and realize these goals. The authors argue that there is no single solution to achieving the goals of net neutrality, since for instance, goals like a free and open Internet are not immediately compatible with the economic incentives for Internet providers. Instead, the authors argue, a concerted effort between government and nongovernment entities and a reengagement with stakeholders from all sides will be necessary for a healthy debate concerning network neutrality.

The Information Society,
Volume 30,
Issue 1,
Winter 2014

Herman and Kim examine the net neutrality debate across key websites on the Internet. Not surprisingly, their findings suggest that pro-net neutrality advocates overwhelmingly constitute the majority of online opinions. Accordingly, the perspectives of telecommunications firms are more marginalized in this space. Using this case study as a model, the authors suggest that online space, if properly leveraged, can be a strategic place of influence for independent advocacy groups.

International Journal of Cultural Policy,
Volume 20,
Issue 3,
Winter 2014

Givskov examines the impact EU cultural orientation had on Danish film policies in the late 1980s and throughout the 1990s. After analyzing internal government documents, Givskov suggests that the European Union’s ongoing promotion of the Pan-European idea helped to institutionalize Danish film policy, resulting in a re-nationalization of film output as well as the affirmation of national film-cultural diversity within the country.

Bibliography