From the Field - Winter 2013

Chinese Journal of Communication,
Volume 6,
Issue 1,
Winter 2013

Zhang and Mao examine the relationship between popular and public culture in the context of online translation communities in China devoted to foreign media like comics, games, and movies. After exploring the history and structural layout of these communities, the authors illuminate how the engaged fan practices of translating foreign content transfer to civic engagement, suggesting a link between media industry fan practices and greater political struggles.

Cinema Journal,
Volume 52,
Issue 2,
Winter 2013

Bielstein revisits the American concept of fair use, particularly in light of the digital turn. Drawing on legal cases and various institutional best practice policies, Bielstein calls for Film Studies writ large to make a concerted effort to communicate its most recent best practices criteria, those with digital media in mind, to university and public publishers alike.

Continuum: Journal of Media & Cultural Studies,
Volume 27,
Issue 2,
Winter 2013

O’Neill explores the ways Indian cinema travels domestically and abroad, between homeland and diaspora, by challenging Hollywood conventions and creating solidarity among diverse and divergent Indian populations globally. Ultimately, O’Neill argues that Bollywood challenges us to rethink our approaches to both cinema and the world, which global media is constantly reinventing.

Convergence,
Volume 19,
Issue 1,
February 2013

Edwards et al. recognize failed attempts by policymakers, rights holders, and intermediaries to control consumer behavior. The authors also sketch out approaches by policy and academic research to understand users, and suggest an analytical framework that revalues user resistance as expressions of legitimate justifications. This article asks us to reconsider piracy from the consumers’ point of view and adjust copyright law to better adhere to the public interest goals at its foundations.

Tags: piracy, policy
Convergence,
Volume 19,
Issue 1,
February 2013

Parkes examines antipiracy campaigns by the United Kingdom group The Industry Trust, paying particular attention to the way they have altered the discourse on piracy since its move from predominantly physical to digital copies, reframing the pirate as miscreant from criminal.

Convergence,
Volume 19,
Issue 1,
February 2013

Newman delineates the contested use of illegally acquired game ROMs in video game preservation practices, presenting the gaming industry’s perspective alongside the views of game collectors, preservationists, and exhibitors. Ultimately, Newman asserts that there needs to be more collaboration between preservationists, games industry partners, and communities of players, in order that long-term access to games might be assured and debated.

First Monday,
Volume 18,
Issue 3,
March 2013

Exploring the idea that abstaining from social media communication is the best form of resistance to the monopolization of human discourse and a way to preserve freedom in an un-intuitive sense, Bassett explores the potential to be found in a politics of silence or babble that can escape the appropriating matrix of code.

Tags: social media
First Monday,
Volume 18,
Issue 3,
March 2013

Gehl interrogates the tensions between free thought and institutions that seek to moderate thought by turning to today’s dominant social media sites – Facebook, Twitter, Google – arguing that these sites are becoming key institutions of “noopower,” the power to modulate thoughts, and are used by older institutions of power, like the State, to become more closely tied to our everyday thoughts.

Tags: social media
First Monday,
Volume 18,
Issue 3,
March 2013

Examining Facebook as a cultural text and data industry, Patelis argues that Facebook industrializes personalized data production by demanding the constant production of such data on its own customized services so that such data can be monitored, controlled, and monetized.

First Monday,
Volume 18,
Issue 2,
February 2013

Starting with the position that businesses increasingly rely on social media to collect information about their audiences, Trottier draws from a series of 13 interviews with professionals who rely on Facebook as a business tool to consider three emerging strategies. These strategies are 1) radical transparency, where a business highlights its self-presentation and visibility; 2) listening, or the surveillance of personal information of users; and 3) a conversational approach that combines corporate transparency and visibility with active audience metric gathering. 

Bibliography