From the Field - Winter 2012

Mediascape,
Winter 2012

Pozo looks at the game architecture of first person shooters to describe the politics of public versus private gameplay. She concentrates on networked gaming and interactions between civilian gamers and military personnel to demonstrate how interruptions in gameplay situate players in geographic locations and alert them to real life competitors

Mediascape,
Winter 2012

Parmett looks at Disney’s efforts to support the recovery of New Orleans through the creation of its first African-American princess, Princess Tiana from the film The Princess and the Frog and the "Dreams Come True" exhibit at the New Orleans Museum of Art. She calls the company’s attempt to foster urban renewal “Disneyomatics” and argues it offers a neo-liberal solution for recovery.

Cinema Journal,
Winter 2012

Ellcessor considers the role of social networking on the brand of an emerging media star, Felicia Day. She describes the “star text of connection” as a tool for understanding how Day uses the Internet to encourage her fans to follow her across media platforms.

Flow,
Volume 15,
Issue 8,
March 13, 2012

Strover reports on a trend from the 2012 SXSW festival: television is suddenly central at the traditionally Internet-centric fest. In the past, digital technologies defined themselves in opposition to television but now concepts like “social TV” and “connected TV” have revitalized interest in the living room screen.

International Journal of Cultural Studies,
Volume 15,
Issue 2,
March 2012

Grainge looks at the efforts of mobile phone companies to create their own flash mobs designed to encourage consumers to spread their marketing messages.  He sees these marketing campaigns as not just promotional strategies but as visible evidence that reinforces ways of understanding new digital technology for audiences, companies, and regulators.

Telecommunications Policy,
Volume 36,
Issue 2,
March 2012

Grubesic analyzes the logic behind the 2011 National Broadband Map. He offers some strategies for improving the survey in the hopes of creating better telecommunications policy.

First Monday,
Volume 17,
Issue 3,
March 2012

Bamman, O’Connor, and Smith examine censorship on social networking sites in China to understand what political content and interpersonal communication the Chinese government allows. They argue these censorship practices make it more difficult for citizens to use digital media to discuss current events.

Journal of Broadcasting and Electronic Media,
Volume 56,
Issue 1,
March 2012

Phalen and Osellame map the politics of the writer’s room to demonstrate which voices are heard and which are ignored in the creative industries. Based on interviews of 45 television writers, the authors argue beliefs about chemistry, hierarchy, and skills shape television scripts.

Journal of Media Economics,
Volume 25,
Issue 1,
March 2012

Fernandez-Blanco and Gil interpret the effects of government programs designed to boost national film production in Spain. Concentrating on box office data from 2000-2008 this study argues  the government mandate for greater participation of TV networks in movie production resulted in higher box office revenues, thanks largely to the influx of skilled labor.

International Journal of Cultural Studies,
Volume 15,
March 2012

Potter argues Disney’s High School Musical proves that children’s programming can become a global multiplatform success. Her claim refutes industry logic that children’s programming is either an “obligation or an asset” by showing how Disney’s distribution and merchandising strategies produced global revenues from multiple niche audiences.

Bibliography