From the Field - Summer 2013

Communication Culture & Critique,
Volume 6,
Issue 3,
September 2013

Using Current TV as a case study, Fish explores a number of scholarly conceptions of audience participation and production, including Jenkins’ convergence, Howe’s crowdsourcing, and Hands’ neoliberal participation. Fish builds on such research here, suggesting each approach has productive and limiting elements that fail and succeed at situating Current TV viewer-submitted videos in their historical, sociocultural context.

Communication Culture & Critique,
Volume 6,
Issue 3,
September 2013

Investigating the practices and processes of media industries research, Wilkinson and Merle argue that researchers have so far not engaged in any deep reflections on the use of business press and industry trade journal reports for academic research. Consequently, the authors advise scholars to be cognizant of the benefits and potential pitfalls associated with using such materials and invite an open and critical dialogue concerning the matter, especially given the scope of and access to these documents in a networked digital era.

Communication Culture & Critique,
Volume 6,
Issue 3,
September 2013

Braun examines the development of Hulu and Boxee between the years 2007 and 2009, noting how each company, fraught with internal tensions, led the way in online distribution strategies that are now common. Additionally, Braun illustrates how each company reimagined the place of the viewer as an active user or citizen in the television landscape. Braun’s work here adds to the scholarship exploring media distribution and audiences in a period of digital transition.

Telecommunications Policy,
Volume 37,
Issue 8,
September 2013

Addressing competition, content regulation, and copyright issues in Singapore’s emerging connected viewing media environment, Lin proposes a platform neutral, multi-screen TV policy scheme. Lin’s policy model categorizes media platforms into four simple schemes that take into account the size of the audience (mass or niche) and the production model (gatekeeping or participatory). Lin asserts that her proposed policy scheme avoids platform-based distinctions that are becoming increasingly obsolete and allows regulators to adapt more quickly to today’s technological and marketplace changes. 

Global Media and Communication,
Volume 9,
Issue 2,
August 2013

Fernández-Quijada compares the independent television production markets in the UK and Spain, arguing that while his findings suggest the independent production sector in both countries is mature, international sales of independent product is still limited by regulation, financing models, and partnerships with transnational distribution arms like BBC Worldwide in the UK or Imagina International Sales in Spain. Investigating both the sale of completed programs and formats, this article contributes to research on transnational and independent television production.

Popular Communication,
Volume 11,
Issue 3,
August 2013

Hesmondhalgh and Saha assert that cultural production studies scholars have largely neglected the role race and ethnicity play in the cultures they analyze. The authors survey current production studies work that focuses on race and ethnicity, and then argue that a truly productive and satisfactory examination of race and ethnicity needs to include macro and micro factors, structure and agency, and change and continuity.

Popular Communication,
Volume 11,
Issue 3,
August 2013

Quinn builds on work concerned with race and media production by comparing the strategies Will Smith and Tyler Perry have used to overcome racial barriers in Hollywood. Quinn suggests the racial barriers these men faced acted as both significant obstacles and unique opportunities, yet also stresses the outcome of their elite status, either incorporation or resistance, has not been adequately examined by media studies and critical race scholars.

Popular Communication,
Volume 11,
Issue 3,
August 2013

Malik traces the historical transitions in UK policies concerning race and public service broadcasting. Malik argues the UK transitioned from a policy of multiculturalism to one of cultural diversity, before finally ending up with what she calls a policy of “creative diversity” today, a policy that depolitisizes race in favor of discussing “diversity” in terms of creative ideas. Ultimately, Malik situates the rise of creative diversity policy alongside other developments such as creative industries policy, arguing that such an approach marketizes television and multiculture while deflecting potential critiques of public service broadcasting in the UK.

Work Employment & Society,
Volume 27,
Issue 4,
August 2013

Siebert and Wilson evaluate the benefits and pitfalls of unpaid internships as a strategy to acquire a paid job in the creative industries while also examining the consequences of unpaid work for those already employed in the industry. The authors suggest industry professionals justify internships by pointing out the contacts interns make during their appointments. However, the authors also insist such a view ignores people unable to take part in unpaid labor as well as the professionals unpaid labor displaces.

The Political Economy of Communication,
Issue 1,
Summer 2013

Kuehn and Corrigan develop the concept of “hope labor” to describe the free online labor people offer in order to gain exposure and “hopefully” acquire a paid position. The authors draw on interviews with sports bloggers and Yelp reviewers, and offer valuable distinctions between hope labor and other forms of free labor with different economies and motivations. Kuehn and Corrigan assert that unlike fan production that values creativity and self-expression, hope labor is founded more on neoliberal values of self-advancement.

Bibliography