From the Field - Summer 2011

Velvet Light Trap,
Issue 68,
Fall 2011

Marx uses HBO’s partnership with Will Ferrell’s Funny or Die to explore how online humor and comedians are integrated into traditional business models and labor structures. He posits comedy is central to successful multiplatform content strategies.

Flow,
Volume 14,
Issue 7,
September 3, 2011

McIntosh considers three factors limiting the digital distribution of documentary films; copyright concerns, cultural popularity/interest, and advertising. Reflecting on the promises of digital distribution, she is discouraged by the variety of ways documentary filmmakers struggle to exhibit their work online.

Flow,
Volume 14,
Issue 7,
September 3, 2011

In this latest entry in Dixon’s continuing series on cloud technologies and digital distribution, he raises the question of ownership in a digital media environment. Without a physical copy of the content, customers will be reliant on the accessibility and shifting business models of cloud storage services.

Journal of Broadcasting and Electronic Media,
Volume 55,
Issue 3,
September 2011

Arceneaux recalls the history of radio facsimile newspapers (abridged newspapers transmitted over the air and printed out on early fax machines) as precursors to contemporary models of news distribution. Interestingly, the biggest supporters of the technology were newspaper publishers who believed that these technologies were not replacements for traditional newspapers but important supplements with their own aesthetic and business model.

International Journal of Cultural Studies,
Volume 14,
September 2011

McNamara explains how digital technology and citizen journalism has revolutionized the paparazzi industry. She argues that the popularity of paparazzi journalism has influenced mainstream news organizations’ publishing practices and audiences’ relationships with celebrity culture.

Media Culture and Society,
Volume 33,
Issue 5,
September 2011

Brennan suggests that production culture research could benefit from an increased focus on the use of humor within the workplace. He points to several important uses of humor in the workplace including its use in resistance to authority, its prevalence in “repressive discourse,” and in the creation and maintenance of hierarchies.

Flow,
Volume 14,
Issue 6,
August 18, 2011

Boyer continues his series on connected viewing technologies by examining Microsoft’s effort to create an interactive television game 1 v. 100. He claims that the series eventually failed because audiences (particularly video game audiences) are rejecting traditionally scheduled broadcast strategies in favor of on-demand services.

Flow,
Volume 14,
Issue 5,
August 4, 2011

Smith introduces an intriguing media subculture that collects failed American television pilots based on successful British television shows. These rare cultural objects provide he with an opportunity to analyze how success is defined in format exchanges, arguing shows that retain too much of their British sensibility will not resonate with foreign audiences.

First Monday,
Volume 16,
Issue 8,
August 2011

The authors examine “mash-up” applications, web services that integrate two separate online activities (such as social networking and gaming), to determine how web companies build consumer trust. Their research shows that “mash-up” applications must balance “data assurance” and “data quality” to appease skeptical consumers.

Global Media and Communication,
Volume 7,
Issue 2,
August 2011

Pinon and Rojas describe the efforts of Spanish language networks to establish transnational audiences through the creation of a “Latinidad” brand identity. The authors use Bourdieu’s field theory to describe how certain types of capital (ethnic, linguistic, diasporic) are used to establish a presence in the growing Latin media market.

Bibliography