From the Field - Spring 2015

Critical Studies in Media Communication,
Volume 32,
Issue 2,
Spring 2015

Freedman adapts the concept of "commodity fetishism" to investigate how current discourse around media policy is wrongly presented as a depoliticized, solely evidence-based arena. He argues that this fetishistic approach to policy hides the ideological power struggles that occur in policymaking and mystifies the process as a whole so that it becomes an activity from which ordinary citizens are largely excluded. Freedman then proposes three key ways in which citizens can reconnect to the policy process and invigorate contemporary struggles for media justice. 

Critical Studies in Media Communication,
Volume 32,
Issue 2,
Spring 2015

Based on primary research from the advertising trade press and ad agency archives, Asquith considers box tops — cutouts from food boxes that children mailed in to get prizes — as instruments for generating market-relevant knowledge during the first half of the 20th century. Asquith argues the submission of box tops was an early form of data mining and as an audience metric to counter assumptions that consumer surveillance is unique to the digital era. 

Global Media and Communication,
Volume 11,
Issue 1,
April 2015

This article considers the political economic context that has led to the ever-increasing number of Turkish dramas for export to international markets since the mid-2000s. Based on interviews with television producers, distributors, and executives, Yesil analyzes how the Turkish production sector further integrated into the global networks of television trade by capitalizing on convergent shifts in this market as well as Turkish government support. 

Historical Journal of Film Radio and Television,
Volume 35,
Issue 2,
Spring 2015

In this article, Sean Graham chronicles the CBC's formative years of 1936–1939. He argues that, while the CBC did not establish a television station before World War II, this earlier period still offers insights into aspects that would become intrinsic to the broadcaster's later reputation: namely, the prioritization of public relations and continental integration as elements of its brand. 

Jump Cut,
Volume 56,
Issue 1,
Spring 2015

This articles chronicles the history of the short-lived broadcast of NBC's The Jay Leno Show. Owczarski argues that this case study affirms the importance of the 10 PM slot in broadcast television programming strategies and illustrates the risks of experimenting with programming in an era marked by significant technological innovation. 

Media Culture & Society,
Volume 37,
Issue 3,
April 2015

This article investigates how musicians are negotiating the new terrain created by digitization and its accompanying business models. Based on a questionnaire and semi-structured interviews with UK musicians, the authors show how a variety of factors, including generic conventions, previous experience, and wider social values, contribute to musicians' attitudes towards copyright. Although copyrights enforcers often claim that this measure is designed to serve the interests and facilitate the creativity of musicians, Phillips and Street argue why the musicians themselves don't always share this perspective. 

Media Culture & Society,
Volume 37,
Issue 3,
April 2015

This article examines the transformations to the global TV format business in the 2000s. Chalaby argues that it remains a buyer-driven market with power resting firmly in the hands of the broadcasters who make format acquisitions, He identifies three tiers of format exporters and the trade routes along which most TV formats travel: the United States and the United Kingdom occupy the top tier while a handful of European countries, Japan, and Argentina fill the medium and lower tiers. Chalaby concludes that the new transnational TV format trade and its commodity chain ultimately replicate the inequalities and power structures of former trading systems. 

Media Culture & Society,
Volume 37,
Issue 3,
April 2015

This article explores the changes to television industries in Asia two decades after the introduction of satellite television in the region. Whereas nation-states in Asia originally saw Western media flows as a threat to local culture and identity, television industries all over the continent now are moving toward greater openness and integration with global television markets. The rise of market-oriented media models, in many cases sponsored by states themselves, has replaced anxieties over media imperialism. 

Media Industries Journal,
Volume 2,
Issue 1,
Spring 2015

This article describes various approaches to media economics, including mainstream neoclassical and political economy, new institutional economics, and evolutionary economics. Cunningham and Flew apply these frameworks to current debates about the future of public service media, identifying challenges relating to institutional governance, public policy, and innovation as public service media worldwide adapt to a digitally convergent media environment. 

Media Industries Journal,
Volume 2,
Issue 1,
Spring 2015

Major film companies contend that 80 percent of motion pictures fail to make a net profit in order to negotiate for better terms with their production and distribution partners, to lobby for stricter copyright protections, and to argue in favor of media conglomeration. In this article, Sparviero disputes these assertions by studying a sample case consisting of 191 motion pictures released in 2007 by producers affiliated with the six major entertainment conglomerates. Calculating the total revenues accrued from domestic and foreign box office as well as home video sales and rentals against budget, overhead costs, and distributor fees, he concludes that more than 70 percent generated a positive return for the producers. 

Bibliography