From the Field - Spring 2013

Ada,
Issue 2,
June 2013

Vanderhoef analyzes the spectrum of gendered discourses surrounding so-called casual video games over the last half-decade. Together, sectors of industry culture and core gaming culture work to position casual games as first feminine and then, tacitly if not vocally, as inferior when compared to masculinized hardcore video games. 

Journal of International Communication,
Volume 19,
Issue 1,
Spring 2013

While exploring remakes in the context of the Indian film industry, Murthy constructs a theory at the intersection of cross-culturalism, industry, and inter-textuality. Here Murthy suggests that a cinema industry with more cultural diversity has a greater probability of producing remakes for wider audiences. This article compliments previous research on remakes in Hollywood and represents a first attempt at explaining remakes in the Indian film industry.

Tags: film, India, remakes
Journal of Media Economics,
Volume 26,
Issue 2,
Exploring the Effects of Online Word of Mouth and Expert Reviews on Theatrical Movies’ Box Office Success 2013

Drawing from a sample of 169 movies released in 2008, Kim et al. examine the impact of online word of mouth (WOM) and expert reviews on the box office revenues of films. The authors found that WOM frequency and the rating of expert reviews were significant factors for box office outcomes in the U.S. domestic market, while only WOM was a significant factor in the international markets, suggesting that such factors play a critical role in movie-going behavior in the age of social media.

Telecommunications Policy,
Volume 27,
Issue 4,
May-June 2013

Kshetri investigates how information about cloud computing affects the perceptions of privacy and security issues in the cloud. The author also highlights the nature, origin, and implications of institutions and institutional changes in the context of cloud computing. Kshetri suggests that right now national governments and supra-national agencies’ roles are mostly passive and reactive regarding cloud computing and security.

Chinese Journal of Communication,
Volume 6,
Issue 2,
May 2013

Chou investigates the impact that unbundling local services has on broadband uptake and developing a “Next Generation Network” (NGN). Using statistical results from 42 OECD and APEC member economies between 1991 and 2009, the study suggests that mandatory unbundling 1) significantly stimulates DSL penetration rates; 2) indirectly influences the growth of the cable Internet penetration rates; and 3) raises the likelihood that a country deploys a NGN.

Tags: broadband, China
Cinema Journal,
Volume 52,
Issue 3,
Spring 2013

In the context of recent FCC reviews of media ownership rules, Heuman examines campaigns by the Writers Guild for a prime-time set-aside for “independent programs.” Heuman calls the campaign a productive failure in that it advanced industry forms and helped mobilize discourses of independence amongst TV writers even though it failed to convince the FCC that vertical integration has established roadblocks for independent studios to get content on prime-time network schedules.

Cinema Journal,
Volume 52,
Issue 3,
Spring 2013

McDonald sketches out the developing field of Media Industry Studies, including its relationship to media and cultural economics, the history of industry studies, and the field’s significant influences in order to introduce a special “In Focus” selection of scholars from the Society for Cinema and Media Studies’ Media Industries Studies Interest Group.

Cinema Journal,
Volume 52,
Issue 3,
Spring 2013

Wasko and Meehan respond to critics who have characterized the political economy approach to media industries studies as economically reductive, inconsiderate of media workers, artifacts, and audiences, and dogmatic in its treatment of corporations as “evil.” In their response, Wakso and Meehan frame the political economy approach as vital for exploring and developing the necessary context to understand the operations of media industries under a capitalist system.

Cinema Journal,
Volume 52,
Issue 3,
Spring 2013

Caldwell offers ten reasons why media industries scholars need to keep cultural and aesthetic studies as part of their vast toolkit rather than resign themselves to strictly empirical approaches. Caldwell asserts that 1) Industry is Culture; 2) Industry is Hermeneutical; 3) Industry is Racialized; 4) Industry is Sexualized and Gendered; 5) Industry is Affective and Embodied; 6) Industry is Disciplined Through Self-Surveillance; 7) Industry is Rhizomatic; 8) Industry is Aesthetically Salaried; 9) Industry is Textualized; and 10) Industry is a Mess. Keeping with these assertions, Caldwell promotes the study of peripheral para-industries that surround and share importance with media industries.

Cinema Journal,
Volume 52,
Issue 3,
Spring 2013

Pointing out the fact that distribution has been explored more than people think, Perren argues for a reconceptualization of “distribution” that incorporates work from across different areas of media studies. Doing so can help media industry studies imagine new ways of approaching distribution as the “space in between” production and consumption. 

Tags: distribution

Bibliography