From the Field - Spring 2011

European Journal of Communication,
Volume 26,
Issue 2,
June 2011

Sperlich looks at the hidden costs of digital filmmaking including the increased editing burden placed on the filmmaker. The author suggests “reflexive modernization,” where people monitor themselves, has had a detrimental effect on the production process by reducing collaboration and creating more uncertainty.

Flow,
Volume 14,
Issue 1,
June 2011

Moner describes the logistical difficulties of producing a crowdsourced film like Life in a Day. A major issue for crowdsourced films is the legal hurdles producers face as they try to convince filmmakers to release their rights to future compensation in exchange for participation in a project.

Flow,
Volume 14,
Issue 1,
June 2011

Winston Dixon expresses concern that Netflix’s streaming media service will hurt the home entertainment experience. The author argues that consumer demand will cause Netflix to concentrate on new releases and ignore back catalog titles.

Flow,
Volume 14,
Issue 2,
June 2011

Davies describes the challenges that producers still face in attempting to depict homosexual relationships in primetime television. Citing complaints from British viewers of East Enders, the author explains that sexual representations of gay couples continue to offend some broadcast viewers.

Flow,
Volume 14,
Issue 2,
June 2011

In anticipation of the Emmy award nominations, Shelton describes the difficulties of creating "quality" network television. Unlike “quality” cable shows, network programs do not get the necessary time to develop because they must prove their worth to networks and advertisers in the first few episodes. The author makes the case that the networks should be more patient with shows if they want to be regarded as a home for “quality” television.

Tags: Emmys, quality TV
Flow,
Volume 14,
Issue 2,
June 2011

Smith describes the ways peer to peer sharing networks facilitate the discovery of rare and/or international titles. The author explains that these networks can bring new audiences to little known films but this interest is unlikely to translate to revenues for the filmmakers.

Historic Journal of Film Radio and Television,
Volume 31,
Issue 2,
June 2011

Barefoot examines the trade press and studio handbooks of the 1930s to describe the origins of theserial genre. These documents reveal that children were the target audience for these films but not the exclusive audience. This finding challenges scholars to reconsider the history of this formative genre.

Feminist Media Studies,
Volume 11,
Issue 2,
June 2011

Jenson and de Castell conducted a three year ethnographic study on children and gaming. Their findings contradict gendered assumptions about gaming as they show that girls embrace competitiveness in a variety of social contexts.

First Monday,
Volume 16,
Issue 6,
June 2011

Doloswala and Dadich present “attribution theory,” a psychological concept that explains casual deductions, as an alternative strategy for curbing Internet piracy. The authors believe that positive interactions between consumers and producers could deter some illegal activity.

Film Quarterly,
Volume 64,
Issue 4,
Summer 2011

Benson-Allott reviews Warner Bros. movie apps for The Dark Knight and Inception. The author describes the functionality of this connected viewing experience and claims it has not yet delivered on its promise to unlock the “complete” movie experience.

Bibliography