From the Field - Fall 2013

Asian Cinema,
Volume 24,
Issue 2,
October 2013

Xiaying et al. conduct an interview with the creative team behind one of China’s foremost and longest running animation series, The Pleasant Goat and Big Big Wolf. The interview covers the production of film and TV animation, intellectual property management, and the development of the Chinese creative industries.

Cinema Journal,
Volume 53,
Issue 1,
Fall 2013

Caetlin Benson-Allott collects a group of scholars who discuss the impact of the global recession on media practitioners through a gendered analysis, questioning how feminist theory, pedagogy, and art can counteract gendered inequalities. Diane Negra explores how two post-recession reality TV shows recall gender ideologies of 19th century class and labor roles. Deborah Tudor and Eileen R. Meehan examine gender representations in Star Trek (2009) and the way gender operates within National Amusements through a feminist critique of neoliberalism. Candace Moore analyzes the digital strategies and fan labor that queer distributors often use to successfully sell films. Aleyxandra Vesey examines the role of gender in the viral marketing of independent filmmakers through a production cultures approach. Kara Herold provides a personal meditation on labor, feminist history, and feminist filmmaking. Finally, Vicki Callahan ponders distributed, networked feminist scholarship in a digital economy.

Communication Culture & Critique,
Volume 6,
Issue 4,
December 2013

Streeter illustrates how discourse analysis can be applied to media policy studies in innovative ways. He traces the development of discursive approaches to policy before arguing that such an approach can reveal points of instability and potential change in current discussions concerning global media policy.

Communication Culture & Critique,
Volume 6,
Issue 4,
December 2013

Gangadharan examines public participation in the 2002-2007 FCC media ownership debate, arguing that despite being ultimately unsuccessful, civil society actors and minority commissioners at the FCC were able to amplify and represent public opposition to ownership deregulation. Significantly, Gangadharan argues that the debate between publics and majority commissioners during the 6-year media ownership debate ushered in a change to conventional politics of policy-making at the FCC, resulting in the inclusion of a wider variety of stakeholders than ever before.

Communication Culture & Critique,
Volume 6,
Issue 4,
December 2013

Recognizing the importance of definitions in policy-making, Lentz traces the idea of “neutrality” in the net neutrality debate historically and inter-textually back to the 1960s during the FCC-led Computer Inquiry proceedings that tackled the problem of convergence at the dawn of computer technology. Lentz closes her article by espousing the benefits of approaching policy research through an inter-textual perspective.

Communication Culture & Critique,
Volume 6,
Issue 4,
December 2013

Vernacular media policies are those that are formulated and enforced in a range of contexts by a diverse group of actors, from parents to Internet trolls to regulators. Kirkpatrick suggests that exploring how each of these spheres interacts with one another can deepen our understanding of media policy.

Convergence,
Volume 19,
Issue 4,
November 2013

Tryon discusses 3D cinema in relation to the industrial strategy of the film franchise reboot. He argues that both are forms of cinematic novelty, one an aesthetic and economic attempt to revive a franchise and the other a technological attempt to revive the ailing exhibition business. Both strategies compliment one another in the marketplace, ultimately forming a new mode of storytelling Tryon calls, “reboot cinema.”

Creative Industries Journal,
Volume 6,
Issue 1,
October 2013

Singh provides an overview of the creative industries in Singapore, using Lion City, an aspiring global creative hub, as a case study to discuss the regulations, dynamics, challenges, and identity of the creative industries in the country. As a currently insolated industry, Singh emphasizes the need for Singapore to reach out to and collaborate with its Asian neighbors.

Journal of Broadcasting and Electronic Media,
Volume 57,
Issue 4,
December 2013

Xu et al. build on economic and cultural theories about transnational media flow by examining the self-sufficiency in broadcast television programming across twenty countries. The authors find that the more homemade programs occupy airtime, the larger the size and affluence of that country’s domestic audience tends to be. 

Journal of Media Economics,
Volume 26,
Issue 4,
November 2013

Taneja considers the issue of monopoly in the audience measurement industry by investigating two competing formats in the Indian TV market, noting that while only one system, TAM, was used for advertising commerce, the other system, aMAP, was considered in decisions to alter network programming. Taneja concludes that fragmented markets can support multiple systems if they serve distinct institutional interests.

Bibliography