From the Field - Fall 2011

Flow,
Volume 15,
Issue 4,
December 5, 2011

Russworm argues representations of characters in video games replicate stereotypes and target the youthful white gamer. Additionally, she spotlights the creative work of video game activists who are critiquing these racial problems to elicit change from the video game industry.

European Journal of Communication,
Volume 26,
Issue 4,
December 2011

Chalaby identifies a number of factors in the late 1990s that increased the speed of international communication and content distribution, calling this historical moment a turning point in the history of television formats.  She argues programs produced at this time provided a blueprint for other international formats based on the exploitation of international intellectual property and multiplatform branding.

Flow,
Volume 15,
Issue 3,
November 13, 2011

Turner questions whether the customizable and personalized global communities of the Internet are truly different from the national and local communities of television. While digital media might help users build new social networks, he concludes, the narrow range of activity involved really creates “zones of consumption” rather than new forms of community.

First Monday,
Volume 16,
Issue 11,
November 2011

The authors find the current enforcement of COPPA (Children Online Privacy Protection Act) forces parents to adopt an all-or-nothing stance for managing children’s social media usage. They suggest a redefinition of COPPA would allow companies to create more options for filtering, rather than restricting, children’s access.

Transformative Works and Cultures,
Volume 8,
Fall 2011

Christian suggests fan studies are an inadequate tool for analyzing the production of amateur web video. Focusing on the web series The Real Girl’s Guide to Everything Else, he argues its production and distribution are progressive alternatives to Hollywood’s more exploitive system. 

Camera Obscura,
Volume 26,
Issue 2,
Fall 2011

Al-Qasimi examines a controversial example of Saudi Arabian media culture to understand how consumer products, national broadcast standards, and religious beliefs coexist. Analyzing three different shampoo commercials, the author argues editing and staging are employed to suggest passive resistance, acknowledge modesty standards, and uphold Islamic patriarchy.

Cinema Journal,
Volume 51,
Issue 1,
Fall 2011

Nowell contradicts popular wisdom that early teen slasher films were targeted solely at male youth. Delving into archived production materials for 1980s slasher films, he finds evidence producers also marketed these films to teenage girls and young women as ideal date movies.

Cinema Journal,
Volume 51,
Issue 1,
Fall 2011

Johnson revisits academic scholarship on 24 to suggest the show is as much about neoliberal definitions of “good citizenship” as it is about reactions to 9/11.  Citing Fox’s use of interactive media platforms, he shows how the marketing efforts encouraged audiences to participate in the world of 24by adopting a “do-it-yourself” mode of surveillance and security.

International Journal of Cultural Studies,
Volume 14,
Issue 6,
November 2011

Creeber applies early television theory to new media technology to argue our personal mobile devices embody the concept of the “intimate screen” from which traditional television has moved away, as it has become more cinematic. He examines the development of online drama series to demonstrate how the new “intimate screens” provide audiences with the personal connection and direct participation once promised by television.

New Media and Society,
Volume 13,
Issue 7,
November 2011

Bendrath and Mueller claim the information sorting protocol, known as “deep packet inspection,” represents a threat to the way information travels on the Internet. The authors focus on the functions of digital technology and the politics of Internet infrastructure to reveal how our experiences of the Internet are shaped by the cost-saving efforts of media companies and national media policies.

Bibliography